Home Lifestyle Literature Santa Barbara’s Most Expensive Home Is an $85 Million Hilltop Estate

Santa Barbara’s Most Expensive Home Is an $85 Million Hilltop Estate

2 min read
0
0
98

Santa Barbara, California, isn’t just one of the most expensive places to live in the United States. It’s one of the most expensive places to live in the entire world.

According to data from the 2018 Annual Demographia International Housing Affordability report as analyzed by Business Insider, Santa Barbara tied Los Angeles for being the seventh least affordable city to live in.

So what does the most expensive home in one of the world’s most outrageously expensive cities look like, anyway?

It’s called Rancho San Carlos, an $85 million grand estate with hundreds of verdant acres to roam and thousands of opulent square feet to live within. And some really cool places to play. While there are numerous buildings on this property — and the 237-acres of land will certainly perk a buyer’s interest — the main residence is the major attraction.

The home is a 1931 Colonial with 29,483-square feet. It was custom built by Reginald Johnson, a notable architect who built many residential and commercial homes around California and Santa Barbara. Set on a hilltop, the house is 17 miles from downtown Santa Barbara, and a little more than 90 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles. Charles H. Jackson and Marcia Ann Gavit were the home’s former owners and builders.

Jackson, who was the grandnephew of President Chester A. Arthur, was an investor, rancher and polo player. Gavit was the granddaughter of Anthony N. Brady, a wildly successful businessman from Albany, New York; Gavit inherited his $14 million fortune when Brady died in 1913. She was eight years old. https://www.workandmoney.com/s/santa-barbara-expensive-home-71fa5ce29c304ffa

Load More Related Articles
Load More By News 365
Load More In Literature

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Check Also

Right to gag: A government turned against itself

Governments go all out for transparency, as long as it is not theirs. Otherwise, Central a…